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Further Testing

What happens after an abnormal cervical cancer screening (Pap test) result depends on the type of cell changes you have.

Mild atypical cell changes

Your doctor or health care provider will repeat screening in 6 months.

Mild cell changes usually return to normal by themselves but another screening is needed to make sure.

Cervical cells change slowly. This is why you are asked to wait 6 months before your next cervical cancer screening test.

Moderate to severe atypical cell changes

Your doctor or health care provider will refer you to a specialist for a colposcopy, which is a test that allows the specialist to take a closer look at your cervix.

It is unlikely that you have cancer, but moderate/severe cell changes are less likely to return to normal by themselves and usually need treatment.

A colposcopy is an examination where a special magnifying instrument – a colposcope – is used to magnify your cervix for a closer look.

This test takes about five to ten minutes. It does not require a hospital stay, freezing or pain medication.

There may be an area on your cervix that the specialist wants to check more closely. If so, they will take a small sample of tissue from your cervix – a cervical biopsy.

Most patients only feel a slight pinch when the sample is taken.
 
You will be contacted when the biopsy results are ready. Your doctor or health care provider will talk to you about the results and let you know if you need treatment to remove the abnormal cells.

There are a number of ways this can be done. Your doctor or health care provider will recommend the treatment that is best for you.

Treatment is usually simple and highly effective. Most patients will have no further problems.
 

SOURCE: Further Testing ( )
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