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Tumour Site / Type Demographics

Revised 15 March 2013

Incidence

Lung cancer which includes tumours of the bronchus, trachea and lung, is the second most common cancer diagnosed in British Columbia and also in Canada, for both men and women (National Cancer Institute of Canada, 2012). It accounts for about 12% and 13% of all cancer diagnoses in BC for males and females respectively.  Among women, the incidence rate of lung cancer is stabilizing after a period of rapid increase, while in men, the rate peaked in the mid-1980s and has since consistently declined as indicated on the figure below.


Age Standardized Incidence Rates for Lung Cancer by sex from 1970-2010


Age Standardized Incidence Rates per 100,000 for Lung Case in 2000, 2005, 2010

Diagnosis Year

Male

Female

2000

60.4

44.4

2005

56.9

45.2

2010

49.5

41.2

 

Mortality

Overall, lung cancer causes about 25.5% of all cancer deaths in British Columbia. This death toll is greater than that attributed to colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer (the second through fourth leading causes of cancer mortality) combined.

Age Standardized Mortality Rates for Lung Cancer by sex from 1970-2010



Age Standardized Mortality Rates per 100,000 for Lung Cancer in 2000, 2005, 2010

Diagnosis Year

Male

Female

2000

51.7

33.8

2005

49.3

35.3

2010

39.9

33.3


In 2010, the last year for which data are complete, there were 1,447 cases of lung cancer diagnosed in men, and 1,155 lung cancer deaths recorded. Among women there were 1,357 new cases diagnosed, and 1,098 deaths recorded. Approximately 52% of the diagnoses were among males and 48% among females, but this ratio is rapidly changing as the incidence among women is growing. 

Incident Lung Cancer Cases 1985-2010 with Projection to 2025



Incident Lung Cancer Cases 2000-2025

Diagnosis Year

Male

Female

2000

1273

1101

2005

1398

1275

2010

1447

1357

2015 (projected)

1576

1645

2020 (projected)

1645

1896

2025 (projected)

1698

2171

In 2010, about 88.5% of the new cases were diagnosed with non small cell cancers; the remainder was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma.

Non Small Cell Carcinoma Diagnoses in 2010

Histologies

Male

Female

Total

Non small cell carcinoma

1284

1197

2481

Small cell carcinoma *

163

160

323

Total

1447

1357

2804

* Small cell carcinoma includes ICD-O 80413 small cell carcinoma nos, 80423 oat cell carcinoma, 80433 small cell carcinoma fusiform cell, 80443 small cell carcinoma intermediate cell, 80453 combined small cell carcinoma,

Age Distribution

In BC during the last ten years (2000-2010) three quarters of diagnosed lung cancer patients were 78 years old and older, and half were 71 years and older at diagnosis. The mean age at diagnosis was 70 years.

Age distribution is presented on the histogram below: 

 

Survival

The estimated probability of surviving up to 1, 3, 5 and 7 years after diagnosis with lung cancer are shown in the table below:

Estimated Probability
of Surviving

Years After Diagnosis

1 year

3 years

5 years

7 years

Lung Cancer (only)

40%

19%

15%

13%

Overall Survival (all causes)

35%

14%

10%

7%

 

The trends in 1-, 3- and 5-year Relative Survival for Lung Cancer Patients in BC are shown in the figure below.


The plot below indicates that the vast majority of patients diagnosed with Lung Cancer died from this cancer; few died from other cancers or non-cancer causes. The median lung cancer specific survival is about 8.5 months. The median overall survival for these patients is 7 months.

 

Source: CAIS Patient Information

Date Retrieved: 5 March 2013

Prepared by: Cancer Surveillance and Outcomes dataeval@bccancer.bc.ca

Date Prepared: 6 March 2013

Filename: q11926

 

SOURCE: Tumour Site / Type Demographics ( )
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